Category Archives: population

Marriages in the Philippines on the decline?

[Note: It is Valentine’s month but love could not be found in Congress and the Supreme Court.  It is good that talk of grace abounds at  Malacanang.  Here are some statistics from the National Statistics Office compiled by birth and marriage certificates registered at Civil Registry Offices all over the Philippines.  While there may be some month-to-month delay in registration, trends of these events can be established over longer periods of time. Please pardon how the tables appear in this blog.]  

  • Registered marriages decreasing

Marriages are generally registered on time.  So the title may be generalized to mean that really marriages are on the decline.

1. From 1995-2008, there were more year-to-year declines than increases, seven of them – with five declines coming in the last five years.  From 2003 to 2008, there have been more than 100 thousand less marriages.

Registered Marriages

Year

Number

% Growth

1995

503,650

1996

525,564

4.35

1997

562,808

7.09

1998

549,265

-2.41

1999

551,445

0.40

2000

577,387

4.70

2001

559,162

-3.16

2002

583,167

4.29

2003

593,553

1.78

2004

582,281

-1.90

2005

518,595

-10.94

2006

492,666

-5.00

2007

490,054

-0.53

2008

486,514

-0.72


  • June no longer among the top marrying months

Timing of bridal supplements of magazines, bridal fairs, honeymoon offers may have to be offered at some other time. Are these months the vacationing periods of our balikbayans/OFWs?

2. The top four months with most marriages [top 3] occurred in May, January, December, and April.

Distribution of Registered Marriages, by Month

Year

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

Total

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

January

12.4%

12.0%

11.7%

12.7%

10.8%

10.9%

11.0%

February

6.7%

6.6%

7.4%

7.8%

6.8%

7.8%

8.7%

March

9.2%

8.1%

7.3%

9.2%

7.6%

8.2%

9.4%

April

9.7%

8.9%

10.3%

10.3%

9.1%

8.6%

10.0%

May

11.2%

11.3%

11.4%

10.9%

11.4%

11.4%

11.4%

June

9.8%

10.2%

9.9%

9.2%

9.7%

9.6%

9.3%

July

6.6%

6.6%

6.7%

6.2%

6.6%

6.8%

6.2%

August

4.8%

5.5%

5.2%

5.2%

5.4%

5.7%

5.1%

September

6.7%

7.5%

6.9%

6.5%

7.5%

7.2%

7.0%

October

7.0%

7.5%

7.2%

6.6%

7.6%

7.3%

7.0%

November

5.5%

5.6%

5.8%

5.1%

5.7%

5.5%

4.9%

December

10.4%

10.2%

10.3%

10.2%

11.8%

10.9%

9.9%

Year

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Total

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

January

12.2%

12.0%

11.6%

10.4%

9.6%

8.7%

9.0%

February

10.1%

9.6%

10.1%

7.8%

7.5%

7.9%

7.3%

March

8.0%

9.7%

10.2%

6.8%

7.4%

7.9%

6.2%

April

12.3%

9.8%

11.6%

10.2%

8.5%

9.3%

8.8%

May

13.4%

12.9%

11.5%

10.9%

10.3%

9.4%

9.9%

June

11.5%

11.0%

9.3%

9.2%

8.6%

7.6%

8.1%

July

7.2%

7.4%

6.4%

6.0%

5.8%

5.3%

5.8%

August

6.2%

6.1%

5.1%

5.0%

4.8%

4.3%

5.4%

September

8.2%

7.7%

6.4%

6.1%

6.0%

5.7%

5.8%

October

8.2%

8.1%

6.7%

6.9%

6.3%

5.8%

6.5%

November

6.3%

6.5%

4.9%

4.9%

4.8%

4.1%

4.7%

December

12.3%

12.1%

9.7%

10.2%

9.7%

8.9%

9.6%


  • More civil marriages now than church weddings

Are church weddings becoming too expensive?  Do more and more couples think weddings are passé?

3. Since 2002, the share of civil ceremonies has outpaced Catholic weddings.

% Distribution of Registered Marriages, by Type of Ceremony, by Year

 

Total

Year/Ceremony

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Roman Catholic

42.4

41.5

39.4

38.3

37.1

36.4

38.1

37.7

36.6

36.3

Civil ceremony

35.2

36.8

38.8

39.3

41.3

47.4

42.6

43.5

41.7

41.0

Other religious rites

22.1

21.5

21.6

22.2

21.3

15.5

17.1

17.9

20.6

21.3

Year-on-year % Changes of Registered Marriages, by Type of Ceremony

 

Total

Year/ Ceremony

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Total

4.7

-3.2

4.3

1.8

-1.9

-10.9

-5.0

-0.5

-0.7

Roman Catholic

2.5

-8.0

1.4

-1.3

-3.7

-7.0

-6.0

-3.3

-1.8

Civil ceremony

9.5

2.2

5.6

6.8

12.8

-20.0

-3.0

-4.8

-2.2

Other religious rites

2.1

-2.7

7.4

-2.5

-28.8

-1.6

-0.5

14.2

2.9


  • Illegitimate births rising

The stigma of being born out of wedlock may have worn off.  The next point of reckoning would be when the issue of inheritance comes up later in life.

4.  The number and share of illegitimate births to total registered births have increased during the period from 2007-2009. And births declined in 2009?  Let us see if this holds out in the next few years.

Registered Births, by Legitimacy, 2007-2009

Year

Total

% Growth Legitimate % Share Illegitimate % Share

2007

1,749,878

1,155,044

66.0

594,744

34.0

2008

1,784,316

1.97

1,115,475

62.5

668,841

37.5

2009

1,745,585

-2.17

1,034,506

59.3

711,079

40.7

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Shoes, Feet and Mother Goose

This piece is a flight of fancy, inspired by the recent (14 December 2008) shoe (size 10)-hurling by an Iraqi journalist (Muntader al-Zaidi) of President Bush.  This is dedicated to those who wish that the target should have been Mrs. Gloria Macapagal Arroyo.

I write this exasperated at the status quo because this may not really happen in the Philippine-setting.  Shoes are only thrown by irate wives at their (philandering-slob-of-) husbands.  Or the shoe-thrower could be shot by her security officers and die in vain over doing something non-life-threatening (but symbolically very insulting) because they would claim that the shoe had a hidden bomb.  So one would think twice… even if, well, the Iraqi journalist called Bush a ‘dog’ and  Joey Salceda called her ‘one lucky bitch’.   

2009 could be the Year of the Shoe; hopefully
 
– the year when she kisses the bare feet of those she supposedly serves to alleviate their plight, especially the poor, but who have instead increased in severity and magnitude;
– the year when she wears her shoe on the other foot to appreciate the value of a hundred pesos to the street vendors, factory workers and farmers vis-a-vis the millions she hands over to her minions in Congress just to buy a vote of approval for her daring forays into constitutional challenges;
– the year when her tiny foot gets stuck in her big mouth for her promises to the nation (Rizal Day December 30, 2002: I will not run again; June 27, 2005: ‘I am sorry’ speech; all SONAs) which she has broken with consistency and without remorse;
– the year when she foots the bill for allowing the misuse of hard-earned funds of private workers at the SSS and the government employees of the GSIS;
– the year when she stands at the foot of the ruins of the Tower of Babel which her Congress led by KAMPI seeks to build in her glory
– the year when she and everyone who has been willing to be her foot stool or be the soft pillows that prop her up on her seat, get booted out;

or
 
– the year when she becomes the old woman who lived in a shoe; who had so many children (because of her population policy or the absence of it) that she did not know what to do; who gave them some broth, without any bread (or rice); and whipped them all soundly (CPR policy – calibrated pre-emptive response of the police) and sent them to bed (CPR policy – contraceptive prevalence rate) ; but who made them much better behaved because of her kindness and compassion…
 
Oh well, it is not bad to dream or read Mother Goose of fairy tales and nursery rhymes… 
 
Sapatusin si GMA (Gloria at Mga Arroyo) at ang KAMPI (Kapatiran ng Abusadong Mambabatas ng PIlipinas) !  Sapatusan ang mga dukha!

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Malacanang claims credit for population growth – On what basis?

I felt the need to check on Executive Secretary Eduardo Ermita’s statements using official statistics.  I aim to show that the statements made by an administration mouthpiece are inaccurate.. .
  • From the Philippine Daily Inquirer, 14 August 2008 issue, page A15:
Yesterday in Malacanang, Executive Secretary Eduardo Ermita said it was ‘not farfetched’ that the government had been sufficiently effective in explaining the need to control population growth.  According to Ermita, Filipinos may have heeded Ms. Arroyo’s call for natural family planning methods [underscoring mine] and some may be using artificial methods, but all the same, these have contributed to the current population rate.
‘So it’s not necessarily a misrepresentation of facts,’ Ermita told reporters in response to the claim of a group of former government officials that Arroyo had fudged figures to show that her administration’s promotion of natural family planning had helped stem population growth [underscoring mine].
Notes:
1.  Did her call/policy increase the use of natural family planning methods by currently married women, 15-44 years old?No, in fact from the data below, use of modern (read: artificial) family methods even increased, in the absence of government support. The administration has no right to claim credit for the slowdown in the population growth to about 2 percent in 2007 from 2.34 percent in 2000.

 

2.  Has she done what is necessary to promote her population policy?Assuming without granting that she is convinced of the use of natural family planning as most effective in attaining sustainable development and safeguarding child and maternal health, evidence shows that women still have more children than they desire, – an impact indicator of the effectiveness of her population policy and program.  GMA as head of state is apparently not doing enough and allocating sufficient resources to support her position and that of the administration on the issue.

[1] The increase in contraceptive use in the last five years was essentially due to the increase in use of modern methods < >, from 28 percent to 33 percent as the use of traditional methods < > actually declined from 18 percent to 16 percent. Most of the gain in modern contraceptive use was due to an increase in the use of the pill, from 10 percent to 13 percent. …
<Modern methods: sterilization, pill, IUD, injectable, male condom, mucus/billings/ ovulation, lactational amenorrhea method>
<Traditional methods: calendar/rhythm/ periodic abstinence, withdrawal>
[2] The 2003 National Demographic and Health Survey also shows that Filipino women still bear more children than they desire. If they could prevent births that they declare as ‘unwanted’, Filipino women would have, on average, 2.5 births, or exactly one birth less than the number they currently have (3.5 births).
Relevant Tables
Table 1.  Percentage of currently married women age 15-49 using modern and traditional family planning methods, Philippines 1968-2003
Survey Modern Traditional All
methods methods methods
1973 National Demographic Survey1 10.7 6.7 17.4
1978 Republic of the Philippines Fertility Survey1 17.2 21.3 38.5
1983 National Demographic Survey1 18.9 13.1 32
1988 National Demographic Survey 21.6 14.5 36.1
1993 National Demographic Survey 24.9 15.1 40
1998 National Demographic and Health Survey 28.2 18.3 46.5
2003 National Demographic and Health Survey 33.4 15.5 48.9
1 Calculated for currently married women 15-44 years
Table 5.  Total wanted fertility rate and total fertility rate for the three years preceding the survey, Philippines 1993-2003
Survey Year Total Wanted Total Fertility Rate
Fertility Rate
Births per Woman
1993 2.9 4.1
1998 2.7 3.7
2003 2.5 3.5

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